Simple and Nutritious Black Rice Bowl

Have you ever tried black rice?  Black rice has a nutty and slightly chewy texture as compared to regular rice and it is packed with nutrients…

I had black rice once in a local restaurant, since the black rice was mixed with white rice and quinoa, I could not tell the “real” texture of it. Well, I got very curious and it is when the search for the black rice started…after checking into a few stores I finally found it at Sprouts, one of my favorite places to buy organic vegetables and fruits.  I was so happy to find organic black rice selling by the bulk and yes, it is a bit more expensive than your regular white rice, but so worth the extra cost.

Nothing especial needed to cook the black rice, the ratio that I used was 1:2, 2 cups of water or any liquid for 1 cup or rice.  I used the rice steamer and it was super easy.

It was weird…first because the rice is really black, second, when rinsing it, the water came out pretty dark and slowly changed to somewhat purplish.  Once cooked, the rice has a mix of black and dark purple color, super interesting. Now the texture it was what got me hooked to it…mild nutty and slightly chewy…a great combination of texture…not to mention that black rice because of the color is rich in antioxidant anthocyanin, the same antioxidant found in berries such as blueberries, raspberries and cranberries.

For this recipe you will just need a few ingredients…I went with Kielbasa sausage just because I was in a hurry and it was just there… please feel free to use whatever vegetable you have in your refrigerator such as broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, etc…

Ingredients:

2 Kielbasa sausages, sliced

1 red onion

1 head cauliflower, cut into small pieces of approximately 1 ½ in

Salt and pepper to taste

Method:

In a wok or frying pan under medium heat place and sausage and stir fry until both sides of the sausage as lightly browned. Set aside.

In the same pan stir fry the onion until soft, do not overcook, set aside together with the sausage.

Add vegetable oil to the pan and the cauliflower, stir until desire consistency. Once cooked, return the sausage and onion to the pan.  Mix well and serve over rice.

I hope you enjoy this simple and yet so tasty rice bowl using black rice.

 

Did you know that black rice is also known as forbidden rice or purple rice? The dark purple color is due to the high content of anthocyanins.  Black rice contains more protein when compared to other rice varieties and is a good source of iron.

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Sweet Milk Raisin Bread

This sweet bread is almost like a dessert…very rich, buttery, cottony with a touch of raisins in it, and stays fresh for days…

I try to avoid making this kind of bread as I cannot settle for just one slice…but here I am again with another version of it…the bread is so soft, light and yet rich at the same time…I love eating it by peeling the crumb as it come out so thin, almost like paper sheets…very addictive. I must admit that this recipe requires a bit of work, but so well worth it!

I used tangzhong or water roux method as in many of my bread recipes. If you like baking bread you must give this method a try…

This method is widely used in Asian baked goods, as the bread using this method are moist, light and remain fresh and soft longer than the ones using conventional method. One of the hypotheses is that some sort of gelatinization occurs when a small portion of pudding paste made with flour and water is added to the dough and traps the moist.

Ingredients:

Tangzhong or water roux

40g bread flour

200g water

Bread

600g bread flour

100g sugar

8g salt

20g dry milk powder

8g yeast

2 eggs minus 1 tablespoon for egg wash (107g egg minus 12g)

150g heavy cream

30g water

50g butter

100g raisin

2-3 tablespoons brandy

Swedish pearl sugar

Method:

 Water roux or Tangzhong

In a small pan, mix all the ingredients of water roux, place in a low heat and stir constantly until the temperature reach 65C (150F), or if you do not have a thermometer, cook until ripples form. Set aside to cool by covering with a plastic film. Please see here (http://coloryourrecipes.com/chocolate-marble-asian-bread-recipe/ ).

Bread dough

Before starting the bread dough soak the raisins in brandy, stir once in a while so the raisins are in contact with the brandy.

Place all the cooled water roux and all the ingredients listed under dough into a mixer except for the butter.  Mix until all the ingredients are together, it will be slightly sticky.

Increase the speed to number 2 and continue to mix for 5 minutes.

Add the butter and continue the mixing until the dough is smooth and comes out of the mixing bowl; this will take approximately 15 minutes. You will notice that the dough will no longer be that sticky.

Place the dough into a medium to large bowl.  Cover and let it proof until the size triple from the original size.

Now it is time to shape the dough…

Drain the raisins and set aside.

Knock back doughs and split the dough into two portions and each portion to 10 small balls. Flatten the balls using a roller pin, spread some raisins on it and fold into thirds. Roll it like a Swiss roll and flatten again with the roller pin. Place the flatten Swiss rolls side by side in the loaf pan.

Let the dough rise until triple of its original size.

Just before placing the loaves in the oven, prepare an egg wash with the tablespoon of egg with 2 drops of water and 1 drop of vanilla extract (if desire).

Bake in a preheated oven of 350F for approximately 25 minutes.

Remove from the oven and flip the bread into a wire rack to cool. Slice according to your like.

Store the bread in an airtight container.

I hope you enjoy this bread recipe using tangzhong method.

Did you know that raisins are rich in iron and potassium? Moreover, raisins are high in fiber but should be eaten in moderation due to its sugar content.

Thank you for stopping by Color Your Recipes…have a colorful day!




Pandan Infused Coconut Milk Sticky Rice with Mango

This is a very simple recipe for the Thai inspired dessert made with sticky rice and served with fresh mango…a must try…

We often order this dessert when eating at the local Thai restaurant, and I always felt guilty in ordering a dessert that was so easy to make…but somehow never came around until a few weeks ago when reading Simple Gluten Free Kitchen post I then decided that I could not wait anymore, so this post it totally inspired by Balvinder…

If you have not had this dessert you must try it, even my husband that was not brought up with sticky rice loves it…

 

Ingredients:

1 cup glutinous rice or sticky rice

1 can coconut milk

Pandan leaves, fresh or frozen

1 pinch salt

3 to 4 tablespoons sugar

Fresh mangoes

Method:

Cut the pandan leaves to approximately 4 by ½ in. Tide a knot and place in a pan with the coconut milk. Bring to almost boiling and turn to simmer for 15-20 minutes.

Meanwhile wash the sticky rice until water is clear.

Remove the pandan leaves from the coconut milk.  Pour the coconut milk infused with pandan leaves and measure 1 ½ cup.  If necessary add water to complete the volume. Pour the coconut milk back to the pan and add the rice.  Place under high heat until boil, then turn to simmer and cook for another 10 minutes.

When all the coconut milk is absorbed into the rice, add the sugar and let it stand for 10 more minutes.

To serve, peel the mangoes and cut into slices or cubes. Serve the warm sticky rice with the mango.

If you enjoy this Asian inspired dessert, you might want to take a look at the Thai Red Rubies in Coconut Milk Infused with Pandan recipe.

 

Did you know that sticky rice or glutinous rice in spite of the name does not contain gluten? Usually rice contains amylose and amylopectin, glutinous rice have very little of amylose and high amounts of amylopectin, which is accountable for the sticky texture.

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Air Fried Taiwanese Black Pepper Chicken

These little chunks of chicken are so tasty and totally addictive…they all come with lots of flavors and are a favorite in Taiwanese cafes…

I love this chicken, and with the help of the air-fryer I am not worry about of the fat that come with it…the original recipe calls for deep fry, since I have been avoiding deep frying at home I would only get this chicken when eating out.  Well, no more of ordering this chicken now that I can use the air-fryer and get the same crispy chicken.  I like to use chicken thighs for this recipe since it has a bit more of fat therefore more flavor.

This chicken is very often found in Taiwanese cafes and are sort of appetizer/snack…finger food.  I usually serve as appetizer or accompanied by a big bowl of salad if I want to use as a main dish. So here is how I make…

Ingredients:

1lb chicken thighs, no skin and bone

¼ to ½ teaspoon Chinese 5 spice powder

Pinch sugar

½ tablespoon sesame oil

1 tablespoon cooking wine

½ tablespoon soy sauce

Salt

Black pepper (freshly ground) as much as you like

All-purpose flour for coating

Method:

Cut the chicken into small pieces of approximately 1 ½in.

In a medium bowl, place the chicken and add the salt, sugar, sesame oil, Chinese 5 spice, cooking wine, soy sauce and the black pepper.  Marinate for at least 30 minutes.

In a deep plate place the all-purpose flour and coat each piece of chicken.  Make sure that each piece of chicken is well coated with the flour.

In the meantime set the air-fryer to 350F. Once the temperature is reached, add the chicken to the basket and set it to cook for approximately 10 minutes.  Shake the basket in between the cooking time.

Remove the chicken from the air-fryer and serve hot.

I hope you enjoy this simple recipe for the very popular Taiwanese black pepper chicken adapted for air fryer.

Did you know that ½ cup of dry black-eyed peas are low in fat and provide more than 20% of the daily recommended amount of fiber?

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Oatmeal Molasses Sandwich Bread

This is a very soft, fluffy and lightly sweet oatmeal molasses sandwich bread which uses water roux or tangzhong method, therefore the bread stays fresh for many many days…

I always wanted to try using molasses in my baking, but somehow never got into it until I bumped into a bottle of molasses when looking for something else in the market isle. No surprise that bread was the first item that came to my mind…so here it is another adaptation of the bread recipes that I usually use, tangzhong method.

Tangzhong is a roux made with water and flour and it is added to the rest of the ingredients. The pre-cooked roux adds a sort of gelatinization to the bread, therefore keeping it soft and fluffy for many days. This technique is widely used in Asian bread making.

Since it was my first attempt using molasses, after searching intensively the internet I decided to base my recipe from BudgetBytes.  The bread came pretty soft and fluffy, I just felt that the molasses was overwhelming, so next time I will reduce the amount of molasses to ⅓ cup. Although when sharing the bread to some of my co-workers, they like it and enjoyed the strong molasses flavor in the bread, so it is up to your personal taste.

This recipe was based on Budget Bytes.

 

Ingredients:

Water roux or Tangzhong

50g bread flour
250 ml water

Oatmeal Molasses

500g bread flour
100g oatmeal, finely grinded
175g molasses (½ cup)
7g salt
7g yeast

6g vital gluten
95ml water
50g butter (room temperature)

Method:

Water roux or Tangzhong

In a small pan, mix all the ingredients of water roux, place in a low heat and stir constantly until the temperature reach 65C (150F), or if you do not have a thermometer, cook until ripples form. Set aside to cool by covering with a plastic film. Please see HERE

Oatmeal Molasses Dough

Place all the cooled water roux and all the ingredients listed under dough into a mixer except for the butter. Mix until all the ingredients are together, it will slightly sticky.

Increase the speed to number 2 and continue to mix for 5 minutes.

Add the butter and continue the mixing until the dough is smooth and comes out of the mixing bowl, this will take approximately 15 minutes. You will notice that the dough will no longer be sticky.

Place the dough into a medium to large bowl. Cover and let it proof until the size triple from the original size.

Now it is time to shape the dough…

Knock back the dough and split into approximately 8 little balls and let it rest for 5 minutes on the counter.

Flatten the ball making sure that the air is removed and fold into thirds, then roll it like a Swiss roll.

Place the Swiss rolls into the Pullman (4 each) pan and let it rise until triple of its original size.

Cover the pan and bake in a preheated oven of 350F for approximately 25 minutes.

Remove from the oven and flip the bread into a wire rack to cool. Slice according to your like.

Store the bread in an airtight container.

 

Did you know that molasses is a by-product of sugar extraction? The good news is that molasses contains some vitamins and minerals which cannot be found in refined sugar.

Thank you for stopping by Color Your Recipes…have a colorful day!

 




Ahi Tuna Poke, Raw Fish Salad

Get a fresh piece of sashimi grade ahi tuna and you are ready for a nice treat…simple and super easy ahi tuna poke (raw fish salad) recipe…

We are pretty addicted to poke since we discovered a while ago…poke places are popping up like crazy in our area, even Costco sells it…we have tried many places and they all have their specialties…I am okay with the Costco one, but the portion are humongous…which often is not suitable for our little family of two, and it does not taste the same the next day…so I decided to make my own…the one that I am sharing here today is pretty basic, you can really add what you like and come up with your own recipe…saltier, spicier, greener, crispier…as you see, so many option.

If you are not into raw fish, I totally get it, but if you enjoy sashimi you might want to try poke. I like to serve poke with white rice or even with crackers.

Ingredients:

½lb ahi tuna, sashimi grade
1 tablespoon soy sauce
1 green onion, finely chopped
½ teaspoon sesame oil
½ teaspoon sriracha
1 teaspoon roasted sesame seed

Method:

Cut the ahi tuna into approximately ½ inch square and place in a small bowl. Add the green onion on it.

In a small bowl, mix together the soy sauce, sriracha, sesame oil together.

Pour the sauce in the tuna and mix gently. Sprinkle the roasted sesame seeds and serve.

Did you know that poke is a Hawaiian verb? It means “slice”, “cut”.

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Dark Rye and Flaxseed Sandwich Bread

Don’t you love when you have a bite of bread and you cannot tell that it is a “healthy version” of it?

Well, I found the perfect combination of dark rye and flaxseed meal in this recipe. If it was not for the color and the little flaxseed meal specks you would not say that this sandwich bread contains “healthy ingredients”, in another words, if you close your eyes and eat the bread you would definitely say that it is “white” bread…

Because we like so much bread, I am constantly testing different ratios between white flour and “so-called” healthy flours therefore feel less guilt when gobbling through a loaf of bread…the big challenge is for the bread to looks of whole grain and taste like white bread.

Since rye flour and flaxseed meal contain less and no gluten I had to replace the “missing” gluten so it will not compromise the formation of air bubbles which triggers the dough to raise.

This recipe will make 2 loaves, and to achieve perfect square loaves I baked them in these USA Pullman Loaf Pan.

Ingredients:

Water roux or Tangzhong

50g bread flour
250 ml water

Dark Rye and Flaxseed Dough

550g bread flour
60g dark rye flour
30g flaxseed meal
80g sugar
8g salt
8g yeast85g vital gluten
50gl whipping cream
160ml water
60g butter (room temperature)

Method:

Water roux or Tangzhong

In a small pan, mix all the ingredients of water roux, place in a low heat and stir constantly until the temperature reach 65C (150F), or if you do not have a thermometer, cook until ripples form. Set aside to cool by covering with a plastic film. Please see here.

Dark Rye and Flaxseed Dough

Place all the cooled water roux and all the ingredients listed under rye dough into a mixer except for the butter. Mix until all the ingredients are together, it will slightly sticky.

Increase the speed to number 2 and continue to mix for 5 minutes.

Add the butter and continue the mixing until the dough is smooth and comes out of the mixing bowl, this will take approximately 15 minutes. You will notice that the dough will no longer be sticky.

Place the dough into a medium to large bowl. Cover and let it proof until the size triple from the original size.

Now it is time to shape the dough…

Knock back the dough and split into approximately 8 little balls and let it rest for 5 minutes on the counter.

Flatten the ball making sure that the air is removed and fold into thirds, then roll it like a Swiss roll.

Place the Swiss rolls into the Pullman (4 each) pan and let it rise until triple of its original size.

Cover the pan and bake in a preheated oven of 350F for approximately 25 minutes.

Remove from the oven and flip the bread into a wire rack to cool. Slice according to your like.

Store the bread in an airtight container.

If you enjoy this Asian inspired bread recipe you might want to look at Sweet Milk Bread with Raisin recipe.

Did you know that gluten is formed when these two proteins glutenin and gliadin form a bond? Moreover, gluten gives bread a chewy texture and traps carbon dioxide during fermentation.

Thank you for stopping by Color Your Recipes…have a colorful week!




Raindrop Cake

How can a dessert made of almost 99.8% of water be so trendy? The answer…it is all in its texture…

When I first saw these raindrop cake (which in my opinion it is not a cake per say, cake in my view should contain flour or its substitutes) I was fascinated by its shape and the notion of its pureness…upon reading the ingredients, I immediately could imagine its textures as I had worked with agar-agar, both in the kitchen and in the lab. The trick is to have the right ratio of water and agar-agar to achieve a very soft almost running gel. A little extra of agar-agar the “cake” will turn into a flavorless jelly, a little “too little” and the “cake” will not hold its shape. Therefore the amount of agar-agar is very critical.

After searching through the internet I found that the ratio of agar-agar to water varied from 0.25% to 3% meaning that in 1 cup (250ml) of water the amount of agar-agar varied from 0.625g to 7.5g…yes, you read it right…so here is where my “experiments” started…

I started with the percentage that I used to use when working in the microbiology lab, 1.5%…then went down drastically since it gave me a jelly ball so hard that I could almost throw on the floor and it would bounce back. I taper down to 0.5%, then to 0.25% (not bad) but wanted to push lower and went to 0.1% which the gel barely set…finally decided to add a bit more and went for 0.2%. Yes, it did work! My notes reminded me of my lab notebook with all the calculations since I was varying the amount of water as well. As a result of all these “experiments” I just can tell you that you have to do your own “experiment” since the consistency will depend entirely on the quality of the agar-agar you use. The nice thing is that you are literally playing with water…

When I presented raindrop cake to my husband he loved it…the “cake” melt almost instantly in your mouth, the combination of the slightly sweet, rosy aroma just give you a clean, pure, light and refreshing feeling…something that it is hard to describe, somehow stir your senses…very hard to explain…now I kind of understand the hype over this particular dessert. With this said, I think that the most important thing besides achieving the correct texture the taste should match its “clean” look…then everything comes is harmony…magical!

Instrument and Ingredients:

Scale, a good one
Water (I used filter)
Agar-agar
Sugar (optional)
Flavoring component, I added rosewater in this particular one, and in the future I plan to add orange blossom water, cucumber infused water, mint infused water, strawberry infused water…and my list goes on and on…

Method:

Weigh the agar-agar and place in a small pot. Add a little water until the agar-agar is totally moist. Heat the remaining water and pour over the agar-agar.

Place the water with agar-agar in the low-medium heat. Stir constantly until all the agar-agar is dissolved. Add sugar and the flavoring.

Pour into the mold and let it refrigerate for 1 hour.

Unmold the “cake” and serve with something sweet such a maple syrup, simple syrup…

I added rosewater on the agar-agar mixture once it was all dissolved and ready to be pour into the molds. Just before serving I grated a bit of pistachio (to give some color contrast) and drizzled simple syrup made with organic crystal sugar.

I hope you enjoy this fun recipe using molecular gastronomy technique…for more recipes like this please check on Honey Caviar or Coconut Panna Cotta with Mango Sphere recipes.

 

Did you know that agar-agar was discovered in Japan? Agar-agar is a derivative from seaweed and has no calories, no sugar, no carbohydrates, no fat, and packed with fiber. Agar-agar if vegetarian and a great substitute for gelatin.

Thank you for stopping by Color Your Recipes…have a colorful week!




Thai Red Rubies in Pandan Coconut Milk

It is Valentine’s Day…these rubies are not to wear, but are packed with great textures, from crunchy to chewy…

Have you ever tried these Thai red “rubies”? The first time I had these “gems” was in an Asian specialty drink store…and I just felt in love with it…they are actually small pieces of water chestnuts colored in red and coated with tapioca flour…resulting in crunchy and chewy texture…I know it is hard to imagine that these little gems carry so many textures.

Another great combination is pandan with coconut milk…pandan is very popular in Southeast Asia, often used in desserts and aromatized rice dishes. If you are not familiar with pandan, you should try, as pandan leaves have a very exotic fragrance. By the way, I was able to find from leaves in Asian grocery.

Honestly I was not very fond of adding red food coloring, therefore next time making these gems I will try to use beet juice…

Ingredients:

½ can coconut milk

2 to 3 pandan leaves or to taste

1 ½ to 2 tablespoons sugar

Pinch salt

1 can of whole water chestnut, 8oz

½ teaspoon red food coloring

¼ cup water

½ cup tapioca flour

Method:

Pandan coconut milk

Place the coconut milk in a small pan, add salt and sugar. Heat under medium heat, when the milk is about to boil, turn the heat to simmer and add the pandan leaves, let it simmer for about 5 to 10 minutes.

Remove from the heat and let it cool, and place in the refrigerator to chill.

Red rubies

Drain the water chestnut and rinse. Cut them into small bite size pieces (about 6 pieces each chestnut).

In a small bowl add the red food coloring to the water and soak the water chestnuts for about 15 minutes.

Once the water chestnuts are colored, drain the colored red water.

Place the “rubies” in a bowl and toss the tapioca flour to coat, make sure that all the “rubies” are well coated with tapioca flour.

Remove the excess of tapioca flour by placing the coated “rubies” into a strainer.

In a medium pot, boil about 4 to 5 cups of water. When boiling, place the coated “rubies” in, and cook for a few minutes until they float. Scoop the “rubies” in a strainer and place them in ice water.

Assembly

Remove the “rubies” from the ice water and scoop the desired amount into small serving cups. Add the pandan coconut milk as you like and serve icy cold.

Note:If you like a thicker layer of chewy tapioca, spray water on the already coated “rubies” and coat them again with more tapioca flour…

I hope you enjoy this colorful and fun dessert inspired by Thai cuisine.

 

Did you know that water chestnuts is not a nut? Water chestnuts are aquatic vegetables, meaning that they grow under the water in marshes. Water chestnuts are low in calories and rich in dietary fiber and have good amounts of vitamins and minerals.

Thank you for stopping by Color Your Recipes…have a colorful day!




Pan-Fried Beef Buns with Chive

Have you ever tried these crispy juicy buns? They come packed with flavors and surprisingly soupy…

The ground beef that I used in this recipe was provided by ButcherBox. The company offered me to try their products, therefore I received a generous box containing a variety of beef and chicken products and a package of uncured hickory smoked bacon.  Before I continue, I just want to clarify that I did not receive any compensation for this post and all the content and opinion in this post are solely mine. The box came to my door in dry ice and went straight to my freezer. The packages are very convenient as they are packed in small portion under vacuum.  If you like to learn more about ButcherBox, please check it HERE.

My son when little used to called these “Chinese hamburger” maybe because the filling resemble hamburger (ground beef), not to insult hamburger’s lover, but these beef filling of ground beef are much tastier than hamburger patties, they are loaded with chives, green onion, ginger and a hint of soy sauce and sesame oil.  I still picture my son’s face when eating these buns, he would have his spoon ready to collect the “soup” and drink it with such gratification.

These buns are crispy on the outside and slightly chewy…but I must advise you that there is a trick when eating the buns…you must first take a small bite making a small hole on the skin of the bun.  Carefully suck the juice (meat broth) from the bun and then eat as you would normally eat a bun.  If you do not extract the “soup” first, you will not only make a mess as the “juice” will come out as you bite and splash all over you, not to mention that you will lose one of the best part of these buns.

This recipe was inspired on this one and lots of my mom’s experience in the kitchen.

 

Ingredients:

Dough

400g bread flour or all-purpose flour

130g boiling hot water

120g cold water

Pinch salt

 

Beef Filling

1lb 85% lean ground beef

1 small bunch garlic chives, finely chopped

½ bunch green onion or scallion, finely chopped

½ tablespoons finely grated ginger

1 ½ teaspoon salt

1 tablespoon cooking wine

½ tablespoon sesame oil

½ tablespoon soy sauce

100ml water

 

Method:

Dough

In the mixing bowl or bread machine bowl, place the flour and salt.

Add the boiling water to the flour and mix. The flour mixture will be lumpy.

Place the bowl in the mixer or bread machine or mixer and then add cold water. Mix until the dough is smooth, approximately 10 minutes.

Remove the dough and place in a container with lid and let rest for 1 to 1 ½ hour.

Beef Filling

Mix the ground beef, chives, scallions,  gingers and all the other seasonings together. Add water gradually to the beef mixture, and stir in the same direction until all the water had been absorbed in the meat mixture.

Assembly

Remove the dough from the bowl and weigh approximately 30g of dough (approximately 21 balls). If the dough is very stick, sprinkle a little bit of flour on the working surface.

Roll the pieces into circles of approximately 4in (10cm) in diameter. Wrap approximately1 to 1 ½ tablespoon of meat mixture) and seal it the same way as you are going to fold Chinese bun.  Place the fold side down and gently patch slightly flat.

When ready to pan fry, heat ½ tablespoon of oil in a pan under medium-low. Place the buns first fold side down and cover. Flip the buns until both side are golden brown. Approximately 5 minutes each side.

Serve hot.

If you enjoy this very traditional dish you might want to take a look at this Brazilian inspired Esfiha – Baked Meat Pie.

Did you know that onion and garlic chive belong to the same family? Garlic chive is widely used in Asian cuisine such as Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Thai and Vietnamese. Garlic chive is garlicky and juicy, often added in dumplings filling.

Thank you for stopping by Color Your Recipes…have a colorful day!