Passion Fruit Curd

This exotic curd made with passion fruit is so aromatic, creamy, tangy…goes perfectly almost everywhere…cake, ice cream, yogurt, pancakes…

I have a passion fruit vine for two years…last year it I harvested around 20 fruits, but this year, the vine was loaded with flowers…I already harvest so many fruits, close to 90-100 and I still have a lot of fruits.

Back in Brazil, passion fruit was available year around…and we always had fresh passion fruit juice. I learned about the purple passion fruit here in US as in Brazil we were used to see only the yellow ones, nevertheless they taste and smell very similar.

Since it takes almost 3 months until the fruits are ripe, I just got to enjoy them recently. I had to freeze (juice/pulp) for later enjoyment. I wait until the fruit falls from the vine and let it sit on the counter until slightly wrinkled before using it.

– Why passion fruit curd is so good?

If you care for lemon curd, you will love passion fruit curd. The passion curd like the lemon is super rich and creamy. The aroma is so enticing…and so pretty with the seeds in it.

– How do I serve the passion fruit curd?

The same way you serve lemon curd, over ice cream, yogurt, cake, pancakes and so on.

– Is it easy to make passion fruit curd?

Yes, you just substitute the passion fruit juice/pulp for lemon juice as to making lemon curd.

– Are you ready to try this exotic curd?

Ingredients:

  • 100 g sugar
  • 5 egg yolks
  • 1 whole egg
  • 200 ml of passion fruit juice/pulp
  • 1 tablespoon lemon juice (optional)
  • 1 pinch salt
  • 50 g butter

Method:

Mix the egg yolks with the egg and pass it through a fine sieve directly to a small pot or alternatively place it directly to the pot (I did it both way, and did not find any difference…just more things to wash).

Add the lemon juice and the sugar, combine well.

Cook over low-medium heat, stirring constantly until the passion fruit mixture thicken, add the butter and mix until the butter melts. The passion fruit curd will be a bit thinner/liquid, but it will thicken as it cools.

Remove the passion fruit curd from the pan and pour into a glass jar. Place a plastic wrap directly to the passion fruit curd to avoid a film to form. Once it cools completely, place the jar in the refrigerator.

Serve cold.

– Looking for more easy recipes using fresh fruits? Check these out…

Did you know that passion fruit is a fruit native to Brazil? It is called maracuja…

Passion fruit is super fragrant, the fruit contain a lot of fibers, minerals and beta carotene. Moreover, it is very rich in vitamin C, therefore a healthy fruit.

Thank you for visiting Color Your Recipes…have a colorful week!




Sauté Sweet Potato Leaves

This is a very simple yet healthy dish using sweet potato leaves…you only need olive oil, garlic, salt and pepper…super delicious!

I have been super busy lately…we had a new addition to our family…a furry puppy! His name is Mochie and he came to us when he was about 8 weeks…we had him for almost 7 weeks and has been a lot of joy for both of us. It is true that having a young puppy is a lot of work, especially for the first two weeks…now Mochie is potty trained and has been sleeping throughout the night.

Mochie is a Morkie, Maltese mom and Yorkie dad…he was only 1lb and 13 oz whe he came to us, now he is a bit over 3 lbs. He loves to play in the backyard and he nibbles on the sweet potato leaves…besides all the stuff he finds on his way.

Now…back to the sweet potato leaves…

– Can you eat sweet potato leaves?

Definitely, they are 100% edible, much like spinach…it can be cooked by sautéing, stir-fried, added to soup or salad. Moreover, sweet potato leaves can be used as a spinach substitute.

– Where can I find sweet potato leaves?

Well, I grow them in the backyard…and they are super easy to maintain…a small area with good soil and lots of water.  The leaves grow almost vine like plants…

Other option is to get them in Asian grocery store or farmer’s market…I actually started growing sweet potato leaves after I bought one bunch from the farmer’s market and made cutting with the main stems…once the roots start to grow in water I transplanted into the soil, and now I have endless sweet potato leaves.

– How do sweet potato leaves taste?

The leaves taste like spinach, maybe a bit chewier and they do not leave the weird “spinach teeth” film from the high content the oxalic acid found in spinach.

The simplest way is to sauté them with garlic and olive oil just until they’re wilted…no secret at all…

– Are you ready to give these green leaves a try?

Ingredients:

  • 1 bunch sweet potato leaves
  • 3-4 garlic cloves, finely chopped
  • 1 to 1½ tablespoons olive oil
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • Fish sauce (optional)

Method:

Pinch the stem attached to the leaves from the main steam.

Wash and rinse many times, making sure to remove all the unwanted particles and drain the excess of water.

In a wok, heat the olive oil over medium heat, add the garlic and stir until slightly golden and aromatic.

Add the sweet potato leaves and turn the heat to high.

Stir fry, add salt and pepper to taste and fish sauce if using. If using fish sauce add less salt. Stir constantly until all the leaves are wilted.

Serve hot.

– Looking for more easy vegetable dishes…check these out…

Did you know that sweet potato leaves are very nutritious and rich in antioxidants? When compared to leafy greens sweet potato leaves contain more dietary fiber. Moreover, they are rich in Vitamin C, A, thiamin, niacin and folic acid.

Thank you for visiting Color Your Recipes…have a colorful week!




Kumquat Marmalade with Vanilla Bean

This kumquat marmalade is amazing, it is sweet and tart at the same time with a hint of vanilla, great on biscuits, toast and everywhere you enjoy a touch of sweetness.

These little miniature oranges are a lot of fun and great as a marmalade, specially because they can be very sour to be eaten fresh. I grew up with it and remember everyone making face when eating the flesh… therefore great as marmalade or candied…

We have a dwarf kumquat tree in our backyard and every year the little tree will have fruits, some years more than others…this year we had a lot…I was even able to give some to my mom and kept part of it to eat fresh and make marmalade.

– What is kumquat?

Kumquats are little oranges and it shapes can be round or like olive. It is translated to “golden orange” from Chinese. Kumquat has its origin in Asia and native to Taiwan, Japan, Korea and China. In traditional Chinese medicine, kumquat is great for treating coughs and sore throats.

– How do I eat kumquat?

The pulp of this fruit is tart and the skin sweet, therefore you don’t peel, you eat the peel.  The interesting thing about eating kumquat is the big contrast between the sour flesh and the sweet peel as often only the peel is eaten.

– Is kumquat healthy?

Yes, like all the citrus, kumquat is loaded with vitamin C. The peel is rich in fiber and high in polyphenols which are antioxidants.

– Can you grow kumquat tree?

Kumquat trees are very resistant to cold weather as compared to other citrus trees, therefore it should be easy to grow almost anywhere…and yes, I have a dwarf kumquat tree in my back yard and had been giving me kumquats for years.

– Why you should make kumquat marmalade with vanilla bean?

Not only because it is pretty, the little vanilla bean specks in between the see-through orange color marmalade as well as the flavor…the combination of the sour and sweet with a hint of vanilla is very special…

– How you serve kumquat marmalade?

The same way you use orange marmalade…in ice cream, on toast/biscuit/muffins, with yogurt, in crepes, in oatmeal, with cheese…

– Ready to try kumquat marmalade?

Before I continue, I would like to disclose that I have been given “Tahitian Pure Vanilla Bean Paste” as part of a product review through Nielsen-Massey. Although the product was a gift, all opinions in this review remain my own and I was in no way influenced by the company. Okay…back to the marmalade.

When the company contacted me to see if I would like to try the vanilla paste, I did not hesitate and took the offer in a heartbeat…imagine not need to cut the vanilla pod and scrap the seeds in your recipe…I was so excited to try it…so here I am…

Ingredients:

Method:

After kumquats being washed and dried, cut the ends and discard them. Slice the kumquats into approximately 2.5-3 mm (⅛ in) with a sharp knife and remove the seeds in it.

In a medium pot place the sugar and water. Bring to boil and reduce the heat to medium, mix gently until all the sugar is dissolved. Add the sliced kumquats and the vanilla bean paste.

Cook in medium heat for approximately 15 minutes until the sliced kumquats are translucent. Remove from heat and let it cool before pouring the marmalade into a jar. Refrigerate the marmalade.

If you feel that the syrup is too thin, you can strain the sliced kumquat and place the syrup back in the pot and simmer until the desired texture. Pour back the kumquats and let it come to boiling point. Remove from the heat and let it cool before pouring into a jar.

– Looking for more recipes using citrus fruits? Take a look at these…

Did you know that kumquat is a symbol of good luck and prosperity? Kumquat trees reach its height during the Chinese New Year (Lunar New Year), and yes, the kumquats in our tree were at their prime during the Chinese Lunar Year.

Thank you for visiting Color Your Recipes…have a colorful week!




Growing Green Onion In Water

By placing the green onion leftover with roots on water, you will be able to regrow new ones in just a few days…

Before I share this week post which has no recipe I just want to let you know that I will be of off for a couple of weeks, and will not be able to make my weekly visit to your blog, but will definitely catch up once I am back…in the meantime I will leave you with this simple way to regrow green onion or scallion.

Don’t you like the idea of having fresh cut of green onion every time you need it? Well, it is very simple…just cut about an inch from the bulbs leaving the roots. Trim the roots to about ½ inch or so and place the bulbs with the roots down in a small jar. Add enough water to cover the roots and place the jar on a windowsill. Make sure that the roots are always covered with water. After a few days you will start to see the green getting longer and longer.  When needed in you cooking, cut the green around the same place you started with and keep the remaining in the water. Once in a while through it growth, I like to remove all the water rinse and replace it with fresh water. If the roots get too long and kind of out of control, trim again by leaving approximately ½ in.

I have done this many times, and noticed that the green onion can just regrow a few times, which then the leaves start to get thinner and thinner, making all the effort almost worthless.  That is when I buy new ones and start the process again.  In spite of having to buy new ones after a while I must confess that I much prefer to grow in them in water then in soil.

I hope you enjoy this simple way to keep fresh green onion always available for your use.

 

Did you know that green onion or scallion contain large amounts of vitamin K? In spite of being from the allium family they do not have large bulbs like the onion and garlic but carry green leaves and considerably small bulbs.

Thank you for stopping by Color Your Recipes…have a colorful day!

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Lemon Cucumber Salad and Summer 2015 Harvest

Have you ever seen or tasted lemon cucumber? This is sure my first time ever…we picked a small plant when we decided to put a small vegetable garden on the rooftop. Since we have never tasted or seen lemon cucumber, we decided to give this plant a try…so after a few weeks we harvested our first crop and made salad with it…so interesting!

The lemon cucumber as the name says it…resembles lemon due to the round shape and yellow color. Lemon cucumbers are sweeter than the regular cucumbers. The skin is a bit hard, therefore it is better peeled.

No recipe…I simply tossed the peeled cut up lemon cucumbers with tomatoes, fresh chopped cilantro, fresh squeezed lemon juice, extra virgin olive oil, salt and pepper…so refreshing!

Anyway, before I go I would like to share some of my summer harvest before the summer is over…All these vegetables were ”collected” from our rooftop garden.  The vegetables were planted in individual pots and it was very fun seeing them grow from a small plant to fully grown plants loaded with flowers and then seeing the flowers turn into fruits/vegetables…even more exciting when we got to serve the same fruits/vegetables on our dinner table.

Now…take a look of some of my harvest…

I hope this post entice you to try planting some edible vegetables…it is sure a lot of fun!

Thank you for visiting Color Your Recipes…have a colorful week!




Sprouting Seeds

This is an edible garden that can be accomplished by only a jar and water.  It is so much fun watching the seeds turn into sprouts and the sprouts finally on your plate.

First of all I want to apologize if I did not visit you this week…I have been very busy at work and I will try to come see as soon as things gets calmer.

This spring I have committed to do many new things and one of them is sprout seeds…I already sprouted chia seeds, which requires much more work as the seeds need to be in a terracotta dish.

The alfalfa seed, broccoli, mustard, radish and many other are much easier to handle…it is a lot of fun to watch the seeds turn into microgreens…

There is really no recipe for it…and the whole procedure is very simple, you just need patience as can take from 6 to 10 days according to the temperature of your home.

Soak approximately 2 teaspoons seeds (alfalfa or mix seeds) overnight at room temperature. Fill the jar with at least 2 inches above the seed with water.

Next day, pour out the water and let the seeds sit. Make sure to tap and roll the jar and the seeds lay on the side of the jar so the seeds are not all in the bottom of the jar. The seeds need air and moist.

Rinse the seeds at least twice a day and more is the temperature is warmer. Rinsing the seeds more often will assure that no other organism is growing together with your seeds.

As the seeds sprouts you might need to split them into another jar, allowing the sprouts to grow further. Please keep rinsing at least twice a day.

Eventually the jars will be full. Place the jars near sun for about 20 minutes, this will turn the leaves greener.

Most of the brown seeds coat will be off the beans. To remove them just submerge the sprouts in water and the brown coat will float to the top.

Place the sprouts into a salad spinner and spin until all the water is out. Place the sprouts in a plastic container and store in the refrigerator until you needed. The sprouts can be kept in the refrigerator for approximately 1 week.

I hope this post inspire you to start sprouting seeds, for more edible garden you might want to take a look in Sprouting Chia Seeds.

Thank you for stopping by Color Your Recipes…have a colorful week!




Salad Using Sprouts

First of all I want to apologize if I did not visit you this week…I have been very busy at work and I will try to come see as soon as things gets calmer.

This spring I have committed to do many new things and one of them is sprout seeds…I already sprouted chia seeds, which requires much more work as the seeds need to be in a terracotta dish.

The alfalfa seed, broccoli, mustard, radish and many other are much easier to handle…it is a lot of fun to watch the seeds turn into microgreens…

There is really no recipe for it…and the whole procedure is very simple, you just need patience as can take from 6 to 10 days according to the temperature of your home.

Soak approximately 2 teaspoons seeds (alfalfa or mix seeds) overnight at room temperature. Fill the jar with at least 2 inches above the seed with water.

Next day, pour out the water and let the seeds sit. Make sure to tap and roll the jar and the seeds lay on the side of the jar so the seeds are not all in the bottom of the jar. The seeds need air and moist.

Rinse the seeds at least twice a day and more is the temperature is warmer. Rinsing the seeds more often will assure that no other organism is growing together with your seeds.

As the seeds sprouts you might need to split them into another jar, allowing the sprouts to grow further. Please keep rinsing at least twice a day.

Eventually the jars will be full. Place the jars near sun for about 20 minutes, this will turn the leaves greener.

Most of the brown seeds coat will be off the beans. To remove them just submerge the sprouts in water and the brown coat will float to the top.

Place the sprouts into a salad spinner and spin until all the water is out. Place the sprouts in a plastic container and store in the refrigerator until you needed. The sprouts can be kept in the refrigerator for approximately 1 week.

I hope this post inspire you to start sprouting seeds.

Thank you for stopping by Color Your Recipes…have a colorful week!




Sprouting Chia Seeds

This is another fun thing to do…sprouting chia seeds.  This is a bit more tricky than the alfafa sprouts,  but well worth the effort, especially when you add this microgreens on your plate.

Oh! Before I forget…I hope all the mom’s out there had a wonderful Mother’s Day!

Lately I have been sprouting seeds for salad and sandwiches…all kind of seeds such as alfalfa, broccoli, cloves, radish…and chia seeds are one of them…I will be sharing my other sprouting experience with you in the near future…

Now let me tell you what I did to sprout chia seeds…

For the longest time I wanted to sprout chia seeds…after a thoroughly search on the internet I decided to go ahead and start the “experiment”…and I must admit it was a lot of fun seeing these little seeds turn into microgreens.

As you might be aware, chia seeds turn gelatinous when in contact with water, therefore a lot of recipes uses chia seeds for making pudding…because of the gel formation, when sprouting they cannot be treated the same way as the other seeds…soaking and keeping them in the jar.

The method used here is like placing the seeds in a small green house.

I pretty much follow this site. I got a few small terra cotta trays. Wash well and soaked is water before spreading the chia seeds.

I started by adding 1 teaspoon of chia seeds, on my second try I added 2 teaspoons, which was perfect since it fill the whole tray.

To find out more how I sprouted chia seeds, please GO HERE.

I hope you enjoy this simple and fun project…you might want to take a look on my method for sprouting alfafa seeds here.

 

Did you know that chia seed gel can be used in food formulation as thickening and emulsifying agent as well as stabilizer in frozen food?

Thank you for stopping by Color Your Recipes…have a colorful week!




Five Minutes Flatbread with Green Onion

This is a basic recipe for no-knead flatbread. It is very versatile as you can fill the dough with cheese, roll it will green onion, or just plain.

This recipe is based on the book Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day by Jeff Hertzberg and Zoë François, which I got a while ago and have been using its recipes here and there. I made bread, rolls and even flatbreads…the basic recipe is very simple and easy to follow.

Of course being “me” I am never content in just following recipes, I always have to come up with something new…so I decided to make flatbreads with the dough…the variation are limitless, with garlic and parsley, ground pepper and parmesan, ham and cheese and the list goes on and on…

Today I am sharing with you two versions of the dough, white and whole wheat, although I personally like the white better somehow…

I halved the recipe since it is only for 2 people, in spite of being able to keep the dough in the fridge for up to 2 weeks. Before I continue I want to apologize for the massive number of pictures…I just felt that pictures would reflect better than words…

I have for you a couple of simple versions besides the plain one, which still delicious, if you are not in mood for extra work…a flatbread filled with melting mozzarella cheese and a twist on the Chinese inspired scallion pancake.

Basic Dough Ingredients:

White dough

  • 2 teaspoons yeast
  • 2 teaspoons salt
  • 4 1/3 cups unbleached flour, and extra for dusting when ready to bake
  • 2 cups lukewarm water

Or if you prefer

Whole wheat dough

  • 2 teaspoons yeast
  • 2 teaspoon salt
  • 2 ¼ cups whole wheat flour
  • 1 cup unbleached flour, plus extra for dusting when ready to bake
  • 2 ¼ cups lukewarm water

Other ingredients that you might want to use

  • Mozzarella cheese, sliced
  • Oregano
  • Scallion or green onion, finely chopped
  • Salt
  • Olive oil or any vegetable oil

Method:

Basic dough

In a mixer bowl, mix yeast and salt into the water (about 100 F) water. Stir in the flour using a low setting. Mix until the mixture is uniformly moist with no dry patches. Please be advised that the dough will be wet. Pour the dough into a plastic container. Cover, leaving the lid loose.

Let dough sit and rise at room temperature, until dough begins to flatten on top or collapse, for 2 to 5 hours. You can now start to use the dough, although it will be easy to maneuver the dough when refrigerated. The dough is good in the fridge for 2 weeks.

Every time when ready to bake, just remove the amount of dough that you need and place the remaining dough back into the fridge.

Shaping the Flatbread

Remove like a large lemon size dough and place on a slightly flourly surface, let the dough sit for 10 minutes. Using a rolling pin, gently roll until flat (about ¼ in). At this point you can brush the surface of the flatbread with a little olive oil and sprinkle garlic, parsley, oregano, fresh ground black pepper or whatever you palate with for…

Cooking the Flatbread

Place a frying pan in a medium heat with a drizzle of olive oil or any vegetable oil, gently lay the flatbread in the pan and sprinkle ½ tablespoon of water. Cover the pan by trapping the steam in the pan, which will help the cooking process. After a couple of minutes, flip the bread and cook the other side for another 2 minutes or until golden brown. Serve warm.

Flatbread filled with mozzarella cheese

Follow the same method as for the plain flatbread. Roll 2 pieces of dough to about ⅛ in for each flatbread. Place the cheese in the middle of one disk and gently cover the cheese with the second disk. Seal the sides by squeezing the dough together like a hand pie. Brush the top with olive oil and sprinkle oregano. Continue the cooking by following the instruction above.

Scallion flatbread (Asian inspired)

Before I go into the details of how to shape the scallion flatbread…here is the picture of both white and whole wheat dough…

pen the dough in the same manner as for the basic flatbread. Brush the open dough lightly with vegetable oil and sprinkle a little salt and then sprinkle the green onion evenly. Roll like a Swiss roll with the onion in between. Take the roll and coil it into a round bundle.
Roll out the round bundle again and it is ready for the pan.

or just make it plain…

I hope you enjoy this simple recipe for making flatbread! Please check the Recipe Box for more bread recipes.

 

Did you know that flatbread is simply a bread that is shaped flat? Flatbread can be made of unleavened or leavened dough. Most of the cultures have their version. Examples of flatbread are pizza, pita, tortilla, lavash, naan, matzo, arepas between many others.

Thank you for stopping by Color Your Recipes…have a colorful week!




Scallion and Ginger Sauce

This is a very simple recipe for an Asian inspired condiment. Only two ingredients…green onion or scallion and ginger…great on almost everything.

I am so excited to start this new blog…the transition to have all the posts from Simple Recipes [dot] Me transferred to Color Your Recipes was smoother than I thought, thanks to the people behind me.

Thank you all for the comforting and encouraging words, they sure mean a lot to me. Although I cannot see you I hear you and carry your words in my heart…I never thought I would feel so close to all my virtual friends.

To celebrate the new start, I have for you a very simple and tasty condiment that I use quite often and always glad to have it handy.

Green onion (or scallion) and ginger is a very popular combination for many Asian dishes. This sauce is used over steamed chicken or fish…most of the time the finely shredded green onion and ginger are place of top of the already steamed chicken or fish and you get the sizzling after pouring hot oil on it. More ingredients can be added, like soy sauce, cooking wine or chili.

On the other hand, many Chinese restaurants serve steamed or boiled organic chicken with this sauce on the side, and I must tell…this sauce is so good that I see everyone topping the chicken with this simple sauce, almost forgetting that the main component of the dish is the chicken…my son, adds this sauce to everything…even on the battered fried fish sticks…

As I mention above, I love to have this sauce in the fridge and I top on steamed fish, vegetables, omelet…practically everywhere that needs a kick in flavor.

Okay, after a big introduction to this simple recipe for green onion and ginger sauce here is the recipe. Please keep in mind that you can add more or less of each ingredients according to your palate…I invite you to Color Your Recipe!

Oh! One more thing, I grow my own green onion, so if you care for growing your own, you can find some tips at Simple Ideas, Growing Green Onion and even in water.

Finally to the recipe…

Ingredients:

  • 1 bunch green onion, washed and dried
  • Approximately 1 ½ oz ginger peeled
  • ½ cup canola oil or any tasteless vegetable oil
  • 1 tablespoon salt

Method:

Cut the green onion into approximately 1 inch and place in the food processor (I used the small one) and pulse until finely chopped. Set aside in a heat proof bowl.

Cut the ginger into small chunks and chop on the food processor until finely chopped, place to the same bowl as the chopped green onion. Add the salt and mix.

In a small pan heat the canola oil until almost smoking.

Place the bowl with the mix of green onion and ginger on a heat safe place and carefully pour the almost smoking oil onto it. BE CAREFUL* since it will be a lot of splash and sizzling. Once the sizzling “calms” down, mix gently and let it cool.

(*) I usually place the bowl in the kitchen sink before adding the hot oil so the mess is contained and easily cleaned.

Pour into an airtight container and store in the fridge. Use as you like.

I hope you give this Asian inspired simple recipe a try.

 

Did you know that ginger is widely used to treat nausea and vomiting? Moreover, ginger not only is used as food and drink flavoring, as well as ingredients in antacid, laxative and anti-gas medication.

Have a great week and thank you for visiting Color Your Recipes!