Grand Marnier Soufflé

The combination of the creamy crème anglaise with the light and aromatic orange flavor soufflé is just divine, and it is much easier to make than you imagine…elegant dessert for any special occasion.

I have been wanted to make soufflé for a while, but always reluctant as it came to me as a very difficult and laborious…well, I bumped into Food Wishes/All recipes and here I am…but please do not laugh at the pictures…

Although my souffle came out of the oven tall and full of pride I was only able to “register” sad and deflated soufflé…I need to learn to be fast and more efficient when taking pictures…moreover, I will update the post with presentable pictures when I have the chance to make it again..in the meantime you will have to take my words…

– What is soufflé?

Soufflé is a French dish based with eggs and mainly two elements.

  1. A thick sauce like cream, bechamel or roux
  2. Egg whites beaten to soft peaks

– Can I make savory soufflé?

Absolutely, and the most well know are cheese soufflé, but they can be of vegetables, meat, poultry and so on.

– Can I make soufflé in advance?

Partially, the sauce component of the souffle can be made in advance and stored in the refrigerator, but the egg white will need to be beaten and folded to the cream just before baking.

– How do I serve soufflé?

Generally, souffle are served hot with sauce such as crème anglaise, fruit sauces, chocolate sauces or ice cream on the side.

– Why my soufflé collapsed?

Unfortunately, even the most perfect and beautiful soufflé will collapse eventually. Soufflés are not like cakes, they will deflate…therefore when making soufflé you have to move fast and serve the soufflés immediately when out of the oven…and be able to see it collapse on the table.

– Ready to explore the recipe?

As stated above, this recipe was based on the Food Wishes recipe with minor adjustments. I served the souffle with crème anglaise.

Ingredients:

For the ramekins

  • ½ tablespoon melted butter
  • Approximately 1 tablespoon granulated sugar

Soufflé

  • 2 large eggs, separated
  • 24 g butter
  • 12 g all-purpose flour, sifted
  • ¼ cup cold milk
  • 1 teaspoon freshly grated orange zest
  • 1 tablespoon Grand Marnier
  • ⅛ teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 25 g granulated sugar

Method:

Preheat oven to 400oF.

Brush the insides of 2 (approximately 8-ounce) ramekins with ½ tablespoon melted butter and sprinkle with approximately 1 tablespoon sugar. Place on a baking sheet lined with aluminum foil, in case of overspill.

Melt the butter in a saucepan over medium-low heat. Stir flour in the melted butter until golden brown and aromatic, about 2 minutes. Pour in milk into the butter/flour mixture, stir continuously, until smooth and thick, approximately 3 to 4 minutes. Remove from the pan and transfer to a mixing bowl, allow to cool.

Add orange zest and Grand Marnier into cooled butter mixture and combined well. Add egg yolks and vanilla, mix until smooth.

In a large bowl, whisk egg whites until frothy. Slowly add half of sugar and continue whisking until combined. Add the remaining sugar and continue to whisk until soft peaks form.

Fold approximately ⅓ of the meringue into egg yolk/butter/flour mixture then fold in the remaining meringue, mix very gently until well combined.

Pour the egg batter into the prepared ramekins, make sure to leave approximately ¼ inch from the top of the ramekin.

Bake in the preheated oven until browned, approximately 15-16 minutes.

Serve immediately.

– Ready for more desserts? Check these out…

Did you know that souffle came from a French verb souffler? According to Wikipedia souffler in French means “to blow”, “to breathe”, “to inflate” or “to puff”.

Thank you for visiting Color Your Recipes…have a colorful week!