Light Sourdough Waffle

This super light, crispy waffle is made using sourdough starter leftover, a very different texture from the classic waffle.

Apparently due to Covid-19 everyone is baking bread at home, especially sourdough bread, so I decided to adjust a recipe that I have shared a few years ago…using sourdough starter to make waffle…the recipe is very similar…using less butter not compromising the super light and crispy texture.

– Sourdough starter in waffle batter?

Yes, although you will need to have some overnight preparation for the waffle batter, still a very simple recipe, especially if you have extra sourdough starter, which is commonly named as “discard”.

– Sourdough discard?

Somehow, I do not like to call the extra sourdough starter a “discard”, sounds a reject, no good…which it is not…it is just extra that you will not use…

– How different it the sourdough starter waffle when compared to the classic waffle?

The sourdough waffle has a lighter and crispier texture, it is very hard to describe, you really need to try it…it is loaded with small holes due to the starter (yeast).

– Why is sourdough different?

The slow fermentation breaks down the carbohydrate in the wheat making it easier on your gut, so your gut works less during digestion.

– Ready to try?

Ingredients:

  • 100 g sourdough starter
  • 100 g all-purpose flour
  • 100 g water
  • 4 tablespoons melted butter
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 1 ½ teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 3 eggs, lightly beaten
  • ½ teaspoon baking soda
  • Powdered sugar
  • Maple syrup

Method:

Combine the sourdough starter, water, and flour in a medium bowl. Cover and leave at room temperature on the countertop overnight.

In the morning, when ready, whisk together the eggs, melted butter, sugar, salt, vanilla extract, and the baking soda together.

Fold gently the egg mixture into the sourdough.

Preheat and grease a waffle iron. Pour approximately ⅓ cup of the waffle batter into the center of the iron. Close and bake until golden brown, by following the instructions of your waffle iron.

Dust the top of the waffle with powdered sugar and serve warm with maple syrup.

– More recipes using sourdough starter? Check these out…

Did you know that many sourdough bread sold in the grocery stores are not authentic sourdough? They found that many uses different kind of agent to create the sourness such as yogurt, vinegar and so on.  Therefore, be very careful when selecting your bread.

Thank you for visiting Color Your Recipes…have a colorful week!




Yogurt Panna Cotta with Nectarine Jelly and Compote

This creamy and light dessert is totally fat-free…combining layers of yogurt panna cotta with nectarine jelly…so good!

You will not believe that this dessert is totally, I repeat, totally fat-free…it is creamy, light, and so aromatic with the nectarine jelly and compote, a perfect match!

I know…I know, panna cotta is translated from Italian as “cooked cream”, and there is not a drop of cream in this panna cotta…but it has been thickened using gelatin…therefore its name…

You can make it into a big mold or little individual cups like I did…it is fun and super cute! This recipe was inspired by this video from YouTube.

By the way, I used the homemade yogurt, which you can take a look HERE.

– Fat-free dessert?

Yes, fat-free homemade yogurt with fat-free milk…it is so creamy that you will not miss the “fat”.

– What is used so set the “fat-free cream”?

Gelatin, an almost flavorless and odorless protein…which is a cooked form of collagen.

– What is collagen?

Collagen is very important for the human body. Our body produce endogenous collagen which are found in bones, skin, connective tissues, cartilage, joints and gut barriers.  As we age the collagen production decreases.

– How can you use gelatin?

Gelatin can be used in many different recipes. Anything from dessert gel to thickening sauces and soups.

– Is gelatin healthy?

Yes, gelatin might promote nail and hair strength, support joints and bones and skin health.

– How is the texture of panna cotta?

It is completely up to you, I like it creamy, custardy… just a little firmer than cream, very jiggly…almost collapsing. If you care for a firmer consistency just add a bit more of gelatin.

– Ready for the recipe?

Ingredients:

Yogurt Panna Cotta

  • 450 ml fat-free milk (organic)
  • 350 g fat-free yogurt, homemade
  • 30 g sugar (more if you like sweeter)
  • 30 g honey
  • 6 g unflavored gelatin powder (more if you like it firmer)
  • Lemon peel

Nectarine Jelly and Compote

  • 2 – 3 nectarines, washed and cut into slices
  • 500 g water
  • 70 – 90 g sugar (more if you like sweeter)
  • 1 ½ tablespoons fresh lemon juice
  • 5 g unflavored gelatin powder

Method:

Yogurt Panna Cotta

In a small bowl or cup place 2-3 tablespoons of milk and sprinkle the gelatin on it. Let is bloom for approximately 5 minutes.

In the meantime, in a small pot add the milk, sugar, honey and lemon peels.  Cook in medium heat stirring constantly until small bubble appear on the side of the pot (approximately 185oF).

Stir dissolved gelatin into the milk. Mix until all the gelatin is fully dissolved.

Cool the milk/gelatin mix in a bowl of ice water, stir gently until the milk is totally cool.

Gently dispense the milk into small cup and refrigerate for at least 6 hours or overnight.

Nectarine Jelly and Compote

In a small pot add the sliced nectarines, water, lemon juice and sugar. Cook on low heat until the sugar is all dissolved. Let is simmer for 5 minutes. Remove from the heat and let it cool

Pass the nectarine syrup through a sieve and set aside the nectarine.  You should have close to 400 ml of nectarine syrup.

In a small bowl of cup place about 40 g of the nectarine syrup and sprinkle the gelatin. Let is sit for 5 minutes until all the gelatin is absorbed.

Warm the gelatin in the microwave for 30 seconds, mix until all the gelatin is fully dissolved.

Add the dissolved gelatin into the remaining nectarine syrup and mix until the gelatin is completely dissolved into the syrup.

Take the cups with the yogurt panna cotta from the refrigerator and gently pour the nectarine jelly into the cups.

Place the cups in the refrigerator for at least 6 hours or overnight.

In the meantime, cut the sliced nectarine into small bite size and place it in the refrigerator.

To serve, gently place the nectarine compote on top of the jelly/yogurt panna cotta.

Serve cold.

– Looking for more dessert recipes?

Check these out…

Thank you for visiting Color Your Recipes…have a colorful week!




Frozen Pão de Queijo, Brazilian Cheese Bread

This is a simplify version of the Brazilian “pão de queijo”, it is cheesy and gluten free.  It makes a great appetizer and can be made way ahead.

I already share so many versions of the famous Brazilian pão de queijo…recipes which each little ball is hand shaped, blended and pour in a waffle iron, Asian style and now blended and frozen for later enjoyment.

– What is “pão de queijo”?

Pão de queijo when translated from Portuguese should be cheese bread. In reality, it is not a bread as you know as bread…it is usually small baked roll with cheese and the base of the roll is mainly tapioca flour and not wheat flour. The texture is not like your regular bread, it is sort of chewy, cheesy and let’s say very different. In my opinion it is a sort of popover, choux pastry…there is no any raising agent such as yeast or baking powder, the air pockets in the little cheese bread are mainly due to the combination of egg, oil, liquid (milk) and tapioca flour.

– History of “pão de queijo”

Pão de queijo recipe is typical from Minas Gerais, which is a state located on the eastern side of Brazil, north of the state of São Paulo. The recipe is traditionally passed from grandmother to their daughters and from the daughter to the granddaughters…the difference in the ingredients may vary from water to milk, oil from lard, but the idea is the same. Apparently started with a piece of leftover cheese, since wheat flour was not common at the time being that tapioca flour from yuca (cassava) was available, somehow in between “pão de queijo” emerged.

– Why you need to make “pão de queijo”?

Because is it easy and a crowd pleaser.  I always have a “bag” of these in my freezer…and I bake whenever we feel like having a small snack, a something to go with a bowl of salad or soup, as an appetizer when entertaining.

– Why this is a great version?

This is the simplest version of all and can be made way ahead…all the ingredients are mixed in a blender and pour is a small silicone mold and place into the freezer. Once frozen they can be stored in a plastic frozen bag (to save freezer space) and store for months until time to bake.

– Have I convinced you? Okay…let’s look at the recipe…

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup milk
  • 3 eggs
  • ⅔ cup vegetable oil such a sunflower, canola or corn
  • ½ teaspoon salt (or to taste)
  • 125 g grated Parmesan cheese
  • 345 g tapioca flour
  • 120 g grated Cheddar cheese

Method:

Place milk, oil, eggs and salt in the blender. Blend until all the ingredients are mixed.

Add the parmesan cheese and blend in.

Add tapioca flour in thirds and pulse after each addition, making sure that the batter is smooth. Scrapping the side of the blender cup as needed.

Now, you can either add the cheddar cheese and pulse a couple of times or remove the blender cup from the motor and add the cheddar cheese and mix carefully with a spatula, until the cheese is incorporated into the batter.

Pour the batter into small silicone mold (approximately 0.6 oz or 18 ml each cavity). As the silicone bakeware are flexible, place them on a cookie sheet or any metal tray.

Place the trays in the freezer for a few hours until the batter is frozen.

Once the cheese bread (balls) are totally frozen, quickly remove the frozen cheese balls from the silicone bakeware and place them into a freezer bag and in the freezer until time to bake.

When baking the cheese bread, place the frozen cheese bread directly in a preheated oven of 350oF for approximately 15-20 minutes. Make sure to leave at least 1 in (2.5 cm) in between the cheese bread (balls).

Serve hot/warm.

Take a look…it is soft and chewy and loaded with cheese…

– Looking for other versions of the Brazilian pão de queijo?

Did you know that tapioca flour is a product of the cassava? Cassava, yuca or manioc is a root like yam, taro,  and potato, therfore totally grain and gluten free. Cassava is  very popular in South America, parts of  Asia and Africa.

Thank you for visiting Color Your Recipes…have a colorful week!




Simple Homemade Yogurt

This is such a simple recipe for homemade creamy yogurt. The yogurt is made using non-fat milk and inoculated with previous batch of homemade yogurt…confused?  Continue reading and you will find out how…

We always have yogurt in the morning and the amazing thing is that I do not even remember when the last time I bought yogurt was.  I make my own yogurt from organic non-fat milk using the yogurt that I made previously…so it is a continuous production of yogurt by taking approximately 2 tablespoons or so from the jar that it is in used. The recipe is very versatile, you can use 1% fat, 2% fat, or whole milk. The more fat content in the milk the thicker the yogurt will turn out.  Although I use non-fat milk I can assure you that my yogurt still very creamy.

There is no excuse to not make your own yogurt as no fancy gadget is required, use your imagination to keep the inoculated milk with yogurt somehow warm by using oven with the light on, top of refrigerator, Instant Pot, rice cooker that has a keep warm setting, cooler or a thermos cooker (which is very similar to a cooler, only retains the temperature more efficiently).

I personally use the thermos cooker when making a large container, but often use the oven if I want to have the yogurt in small individual cups.

Oh! Make sure that you have a candy thermometer or any thermometer as the temperature is very important.  If the temperature of the milk is too high it will kill the live culture, or if it is too cold it will not the optimal for the culture to develop…therefore the only important parameter is the temperature.

The making of yogurt always reminds me of my microbiology laboratory where I used to cultivate all kind of bacteria and yeast…a lot of fun!

 

Ingredients:

  • 2 quart of milk (any of your choice)
  • 2 tablespoons of plain organic yogurt, preferably nothing added but live and active culture.

Method:

Place the milk in a pot and bring to simmer until bubbles form around the edges, around 180F. Stir frequently as it heats preventing crust in the bottom of the pan.

Remove the milk from the heat and let it cool until approximately 110 to 120F, do not add the yogurt below 110F or above 118F.

Place the yogurt in the jar and pour approximately ¼ of the milk and stir gently, once the yogurt is totally incorporated in the milk, add the remaining milk to the jar and stir again. I like to pass the milk through a fine colander to retain any unwanted particles or film produced during the heating process to have a smooth and creamy yogurt.

Cover the jar and place in the warm spot you selected. Do not disturb the jar while resting. Let the mixture sit for 6 to 12 hours. Just remember that the longer the yogurt sits the tangy it will taste.

Transfer the jar in the refrigerator and chill.  The yogurt will continue to thicken as it cools.

If you care for a thicker yogurt you can pour the whey liquid away and pass the yogurt through cheesecloth.

Make sure to reserve roughly 2 tablespoons of the yogurt for the next batch.

I hope you enjoy this simple method of making yogurt…check on the some of the recipes these recipes…Fresh Berries with Vanilla Yogurt or Yogurt with Honey Caviar recipes.

 

Did you know that yogurt is the most consumed fermented dairy product? Not only prevents osteoporosis due to the calcium and vitamin D from the milk, yogurt is loaded with live good bacteria, called probiotic. Probiotic food help to keep you gut healthy. The good bacteria use the sugar in the milk (lactose) and transforms into acid lactic, therefore for its tangy flavor.

Thank you for visiting Color Your Recipes…have a colorful week!




French Toast with Blueberries

This is a pretty classic and traditional recipe for French toast…so what’s special? Well, I used the yolk custard bread…which is soft, fluffy and rich. Great for breakfast or brunch!

When living in Brazil, we would use a kind of bread similar to baguette to make “rabanada”, and I got very intrigued after moving to US and discovered the similarity between “rabanada” and French toast, mainly because the shape was totally different, round versus square. Moreover, we would dust the “rabanada” with cinnamon and sugar and it was mostly served during Christmastime for breakfast.

I do not make often French toast, after being in a baking frenzy mood lately I decided to use the Egg Yolk Custard Bread to make this simple and easy French toast, especially that I have a whole loaf of bread and I am already itching to bake more. This is a very simple recipe…although I still have to see a “difficult” recipe for French toast…yes, it came out very creamy, rich and it is such a treat for breakfast.

Ingredients:

  • 2 thick slices of yolk custard bread (brioche, baguette, challah or white bread)
  • ½ teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • ¼ teaspoon ground nutmeg
  • 1 tablespoon sugar
  • 1 egg
  • 2 tablespoons milk
  • 2 tablespoons heavy cream
  • ½ teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1 tablespoon butter

 

  • Fresh blueberries
  • Whipped cream or maple syrup
  • Or whatever you want on your French toast

Method:

In a deep pie plate whisk together cinnamon, egg, nutmeg, milk, sugar, vanilla extract and heavy cream.

Dip the bread in the egg mixture by coating both sides.

In a skillet, melt the butter over medium heat. Fry the bread slices until golden brown, then flip to cook the other side.

Serve with fresh whipped cream, blueberries and/or syrup.

If you enjoy this simple recipe for French toast you might want to try Waffle Iron Churros recipes.

 

Did you know that in France and some other countries, French toast is called “pain perdu”? Pain perdu means “lost bread”, by dipping the bread in an egg mixture it is a way to recover the stale bread.

Thank you for stopping by Color Your Recipes…have a colorful week!




Simple Flan

I know, I know there are hundreds of recipes for flan and here I am sharing another one…but trust me, this recipe is very simple and only requires a few ingredients. Moreover, I can assure you that whoever tries this flan will fall in love with it. It is not overwhelmingly sweet and the texture is silky and creamy. There are no words to describe it! It is true that it is loaded of calories, but we need to indulge ourselves once in a while right?

You can bake the flan in small size ramekins or when going to a potluck, I like to bake the flan in a pyrex form. Everytime that I am going to a potluck party and do not know what to bring…or do not feel like cooking/baking…flan is the solution. It is simple,easy and enjoyed by all…Okay, enough of bragging about this flan, let’s go to the ingredients and method.

Ingredients:

Caramel
½ cup sugar
Enough water to dissolve the sugar, approximately ¼ cup

Flan
1 can of condensed milk (NOT evaporated milk)
3 cans of skim milk (measured by the condensed milk can)
5 eggs
1 teaspoon vanilla extract

Method:

Caramel

In a small pan place the water and the sugar, mix until the sugar is dissolved. Boil the sugar mix until the water is totally evaporated and the sugar is thick and brown. Do not mix while it is cooking otherwise the sugar will crystallize. Carefully pour the caramelized sugar into the ramekins and gently rotate the ramekin so the caramel is evenly spread. Let the sugar cool down and set the ramekins aside.

Flan

In a blender add all the ingredients listed under “flan”, make sure that it is well mixed. Pour into the ramekins where the brown sugar is already hard. The flan mixture will be liquidy at this stage. Bake the flan in water-bath (banho-maria in Portuguese) for approximately 1 to 1 ½ at 275F. The top will be slightly golden and when gently shaken, the flan in ramekins will feel settled.

Let it cool completely and refrigerate for at least 2 hours or overnight.

Before serving, place a plate larger on top of the ramekin and in one movement, flip the ramekin carefully on a plate. Tap on the ramekin a couple of time and the flan will slide on the plate together with the caramel sauce

Garnish as  desired and serve.

If you enjoy this simple flan recipe you might want to check on a richer version of flan recipe.

 

Did you know that flan recipes are found as far back as ancient Rome and is was originally a savory dish? The word “flan” is derived from the Latin “flado”, which means flat cake.

Thank you for stopping by Simple Recipes and have a great week!