1

Hybrid Sourdough Ciabatta Bread

This bread is super chewy and has a thin and light crusty crust with holly crumb…delicious as sandwich or just dipped into a nice olive oil…and no-knead!

– Hybrid?

Yes, in this recipe I combined two methods… methods that I used when making sourdough and ciabatta bread…and eliminating many steps.

– How this hybrid bread tastes?

Well, pretty much as the name says…sourdough and ciabatta…the bread is a bit chewer than the ciabatta bread with a hint of the sourness from the sourdough.

– Is this recipe easy to follow?

Absolutely, especially if you have sourdough ready to go…mix all the ingredients and just using stretch & fold and stretch & coil method…no-kneading at all. Just be very patient and let time work on the dough and strengthen the dough by development of gluten.

– How do I store the bread?

I usually leave one loaf in the refrigerator wrapped in plastic bag when consumed in a few days. Toast the slices or reheat the whole loaf at 350oF for 20-30 minutes.

– Can I freeze the bread?

Yes, as soon as the bread cools down, place in a freezer bag, remove as much air as you can and store in the freezer until ready to enjoy. You can thaw the bread by placing the bread overnight in the refrigerator and reheat at 350oF for 30 minutes or so by spraying the crust with water before placing it in the oven.

– Are you ready to try this easy and yet delicious bread?

Ingredients:

  • 180 g sourdough starter (100% hydration)
  • 915 g bread flour
  • 695 g water
  • 2 g yeast
  • 15 g salt
  • 30 g olive oil

Method:

The tutorial for the 78% hydration ciabatta can be found HERE.

In a rectangle container with lid, mix the water with yeast.  Stir gently until all the yeast is totally dissolved.

Add in the sourdough starter and mix. Next add olive oil, flour and salt.  Mix using a Danish dough whisk or spatula as the dough will be very wet.

Mix until the dough comes together.

Cover the dough and let it rest for 1 hour in a warm environment.

Using a stretch and fold method, wet your hands and gently pull the dough from one side of the container and fold into the middle of the dough. Do the same on the other three sides of the container, folding always into the middle of the dough.

Once all the sides had been stretched and fold over, flip the dough so the fold in on the bottom of the dough.

Cover and again let it rest in a warm place for 45 minutes to 1 hour.

Once the time is up, perform the same stretch and fold (all for sides of the container and tuck the fold on the bottom again). Cover and let it rest in a warm place for another 45 minutes to 1 hour.

Next we will be using the coil and fold method. Wet your hands and reach under the dough which is spread on the container and lift slowly, the front of the dough will detach and go under forming a coil, repeat on the opposite side. Then use the same method on the other side.

Let it rest for 45 minutes and repeat the method of fold/coil. Cover and let it rest in a warm place for 45 minutes to 1 hr. The dough will be very giggling…if you feel that the dough does not have enough elasticity, go another round of fold/coil.

Sprinkle flour on the counter and on top of the dough. Turn the container with the dough on the counter and let the dough fall into the flour surface.

Sprinkle more flour on the top of dough and loose the bottom with the help of dough scraper.

Cut into 4 pieces, and gently place them on a parchment paper lined cookie sheet.  Sprinkle more flour on the top to avoid sticking. Cover and let it rest for approximately 1 to 1 ½ hour.

In the meantime, preheat the oven to 450oF with an empty pan on the bottom of the oven and boil approximately 1 to ½ cup of water.

Spray the dough with a little water, then place the dough into the oven and carefully add the boiling water on the empty pan to create steam. Close the oven door and bake for 15 minutes at 450oF.

For the first 15 minutes, spray a little water in the oven every 3-4 minutes. After the 15 minutes, remove the water in the oven and lower the temperature to 425oF and bake for another 15 minutes.

Turn the oven off and leave the oven door ajar for 10 minutes.

Remove the sourdough ciabatta from the oven and let it cool completely on a wire rack.

– Looking for different bread recipes? Check these out…

Thank you for visiting Color Your Recipes…have a colorful week!




Light Ciabatta, 78% Hydration

This ciabatta has a super open crumb, it is so light and airy…perfect to dip into an extra virgin olive oil, as your soup companion or as sandwich.

With the present social distancing, for me baking bread has been one of the best therapy, as I twist here and there recipes to see if I can get a better result…and all my friends love it as I tend to send them out very often.

If you are not familiar with ciabatta please look at this post and this one

– Why is this ciabatta so light?

It is so light because has 78% of water in the dough.

– Is the dough very sticky?

Definitely, since 78% it’s water…as the gluten forms less sticky the dough will be. As the ratio of water increases, harder is to handle the dough.

– What is the secret to work with sticky dough?

Wet hands…yes, wetting your hands before handling the dough makes all the difference.

– Is it really a no-knead bread?

Absolutely…only mix well and use two methods, stretch and fold (all four sides) and coil and fold (2 sides).

– Is it hard to achieve such an open crumb?

Yes, just follow the recipe carefully and handle the dough very gently.

In this recipe I added extra steps as compared to the Easy No-Knead Ciabatta and I believe I got a better texture.

– Ready to check on the recipe?

I end up with 3 loaves and gave two to my friends that live in the area…no need to mention that they were so happy as it is so hard to find freshly baked bread now days due to the lock down.

Ingredients for:

2 loaves

  • 530 g bread flour
  • 414 g water
  • 20 g olive oil
  • 8 g salt
  • 3 g yeast

3 loaves

  • 800 g bread flour
  • 624 g water
  • 30 g olive oil
  • 12 g salt
  • 4 g yeast

4 loaves

  • 1100 g bread flour
  • 858 g water
  • 40 g olive oil
  • 17 g salt
  • 5 g yeast

Method:

In a rectangle container with lid, mix the water with yeast.  Stir gently until all the yeast is totally dissolved.

Add in olive oil, salt and flour.  Mix using a Danish dough whisk as the dough will be very wet.

Mix until the dough comes together.

Cover the dough and let it rest for 1 hour in a warm environment.

Using a stretch and fold method, wet your hands and gently pull the dough from one side of the container and fold into the middle of the dough. Do the same on the other three sides of the container, folding always into the middle of the dough.

Once all the sides had been stretched and fold over, flip the dough so the fold in on the bottom of the dough.

Cover and again let it rest in a warm place for 45 minutes to 1 hour.

Once the time is up, perform the same stretch and fold (all for sides of the container and tuck the fold on the bottom again). Cover and let it rest in a warm place for another 45 minutes to 1 hour.

Next we will be using the coil and fold method. Wet your hands and reach under the dough which is spread on the container and lift slowly, the front of the dough will detach and go under forming a coil, repeat on the opposite side. Then use the same method on the other side.

Let it rest for 45 minutes and repeat the method of fold/coil. Cover and let it rest in a warm place for 45 minutes to 1 hr. The dough will be very giggling…

Sprinkle flour on the counter and on top of the dough. Turn the container with the dough on the counter and let the dough fall into the flour surface.

Sprinkle more flour on the top of dough and loose the bottom with the help of dough scraper.

Cut into 3 pieces, and gently place them on a parchment paper lined cookie sheet.  Sprinkle more flour on the top to avoid sticking. Cover and let it rest for approximately 1 to 1 ½ hour.

In the meantime, preheat the oven to 450oF with an empty pan on the bottom of the oven and boil approximately 1 to ½ cup of water.

Spray the dough with a little water, then place the dough into the oven and carefully add the boiling water on the empty pan to create steam. Close the oven door and bake for 15 minutes at 450oF.

For the first 10 minutes, spray a little water in the oven every 5 minutes. After the 15 minutes, remove the water in the oven and lower the temperature to 425oF and bake for another 15 minutes.

Turn the oven off and leave the oven door ajar for 10 minutes.

Remove the ciabatta from the oven and let it cool completely on a wire rack.

Ready to be picked up…

– Looking for more bread recipes? Check these out…

Thank you for visiting Color Your Recipes…have a colorful week!




No-Knead Kalamata Olive Ciabatta

This ciabatta has a slightly crispy crust and chewy crumb with all size of holes and loaded with Kalamata olive…delicious for sandwich or just dipped in olive oil.

My husband loves olives, all kind of olive, so when I made this bread he was is awe…and now this is his favorite bread…

his simple and easy no-knead ciabatta uses an overnight poolish, so you need to plan ahead…but after this first step there is not other trick…indeed super simple and easy.

– What is ciabatta?

Ciabatta is Italian means “slipper”, meaning that the bread is so running that has a shape of slipper…mainly flat.

– No-knead ciabatta?

Yes, like all the other no-knead bread, ciabatta can be made using the same method.

– What is poolish?

Poolish is a starter or pre-dough which is made of 100% hydration (equal parts of water and flour by weight) and a pinch of yeast. Allow the poolish to develop for about 12 to 16 hours depending of the room temperature.

– Are you ready to try this recipe?

Ingredients:

Poolish

  • 100 g water
  • 100 g bread flour
  • 1 pinch of yeast

Final Dough

  • 325 g water
  • 15 g olive oil
  • 5 g salt
  • 2 g yeast
  • 100 g whole wheat flour
  • 300 g bread flour
  • 150 g Kalamata olive drained and sliced

Method:

Poolish

The night or late afternoon before, in a medium/large bowl dissolve the yeast into the water and add the flour. Mix well and cover. Let the poolish ferment at room temperature for 12-16 hours.

Once the poolish has lots and lots of bubbles and started to collapse on the top and smell sweet, it is time to start the bread.

Final Dough

Measure and add the water and pour into the poolish.  Mix gently to loosen the poolish up. Add the, olive oil, flours, yeast and salt.

Mix it up with a Danish dough whisk or with a fork. Mix until the dough comes together. Go around the bowl (rotating approximately ¼ every time) using a stretch and fold method for 10 times.

Place the dough onto a rectangle container with lid and let the dough rest for 1 hour.

Fold in the sliced Kalamata olives using the stretch and fold method until the olives are evenly spread into the dough (4 times). Cover the dough and let it rest for 30 minutes.

Use the coil and fold method, 4 times and tuck the end of the dough down. Cover the dough and rest for 30 minutes.

Repeat the process for another 2 times. Resting for 45 minutes in between.

After the last dough resting, 40 to 45 minutes, sprinkle flour on the counter and on top of the dough.

Turn the container with the dough on the counter and let the dough fall into the flour surface.

Sprinkle more flour on the dough and loose the bottom with the help of dough scraper.

Cut into 2 pieces and place them on a flour couch. Do not worry about its shape. Sprinkle more flour on the top if necessary, to avoid sticking. Cover for approximately 45 to 50 minutes.

In the meantime, preheat the oven to 450oF with a pan containing water.

Gently transfer the dough to a pan lined with parchment paper.

Bake for 15 minutes at 450oF. Remove the water in the oven and bake for another 10 minutes. Lower the temperature to 425oF and bake for another 5 minutes.

Remove from the oven and let it cool completely on a wire rack.

\

– If you enjoy this simple and easy recipe of no-knead bread, you might want to look at these…

Did you know that olive is a fruit? Kalamata olives were originally from Greece and in now days these olives grow in United States and Australia. Olives are considered healthy, as they are a good source of fiber and vitamins.

Thank you for visiting Color Your Recipes…have a colorful week!




No-Knead Multi-Seed Sourdough Bread

This sourdough bread is exceptional, super hearty…loaded with a variety of seeds which gives each bite a very complex and amazing texture, not to mention the flavor.

This sourdough bread recipe is mainly based on the one that I posted a few weeks ago…after baking so many sourdough breads I needed more challenges and decided to add seeds into the dough.

– What kind of seeds can I add to the sourdough bread?

You can pretty much add anything you like, I chose to add chia seeds, poppy seeds, black and white sesame seeds, hump seeds and sunflower seeds…I did add pepitas (pumpkin seeds) and flaxseeds in the addition of the previous mentioned.

– How this bread tastes?

Oh…it is hearty, chewy and nutty…every bite is loaded with lots of seeds.

– Are you ready to try this 5 seeds sourdough bread?

Ingredients:

  • 240 g mature sourdough starter (100% hydration)
  • 410 g bread flour
  • 90 g semolina flour (or use all bread flour)
  • 300 g water
  • 10 g salt
  • 20 g poppy seeds
  • 30 g chia seeds
  • 40 g toasted sesame seed (black and white)
  • 30 g hemp seeds
  • 50 g raw sunflower seeds
  • 100 g water

Method:

In a medium bowl whisk the bread flour and semolina flour (if using) with 300 g water until all the water is totally incorporated into the flour. Cover and let it rest for about 2 to 3 hours, this process is called autolyze.

In the meantime, place the chia seeds, poppy seeds into a small bowl with 100 ml of water and let it sit for 2 to 3 hours until the dough is ready.

Add the sourdough starter and the seeds soaked in water to the dough and mix until the starter and seeds are completely mixed to the dough. Use the stretch and fold method around the bowl, approximately 50 times. There will be gluten forming.

Cover the dough and let it rest for 30 minutes.

Add the salt, hemp seeds and sesame seeds. Mix again using the stretch and fold method until all the salt and seeds are incorporated into the dough.

Rest for 30 minutes. Spray the counter with a little water and place the dough on it.  Laminate the dough and fold into thirds, twice. Place the dough back into the bowl and cover.

Rest for another 30 minutes. Sprinkle the counter with a little amount of flour and place the dough on it. Stretch and fold the dough to the center, 4 times around it. Place it back to the bowl and cover.

Rest for 45 minutes, add the sunflower seeds and repeat the stretch and fold the dough to the center.

Rest for 45 minutes. Place the dough over the moist counter and fold and coil the dough twice.

Rest for 45 minutes and repeat the fold and coil.

Rest for 45 minutes.  Sprinkle flour on the counter and on the top of the dough. Flip the bowl on the counter and let the dough fall on the flour surface.

Pre-shape the dough by stretching and folding to the center of the dough.

Flour well the banneton and place the dough seam up.

Place the dough in the refrigerator overnight, uncovered.

Next morning, pre-heat oven to 475oF with a tray of water.

In the meantime, boil more water.

Flip the dough from the banneton to a floury surface. Using a soft brush, gently brush off excess of flour. Make the cut on the dough and spray with water. Place the dough into the hot oven.  Carefully add the boiling water to the tray. Close the oven door.

Spray more water on the dough every 3 minutes, 3 times. After 15 minutes of baking, remove the water tray and the parchment paper underneath the bread. Lower the temperature to 375oC, bake for another 20 minutes.

Remove the bread from the oven and let it cool on a wire rack. Make sure the bread is completely cool before slicing.

– Looking for more bread recipe? Check these out…

Thank you for visiting Color Your Recipes…have a colorful week!




Rustic No-Knead Sourdough Bread

This sourdough bread is loaded with complex flavor baked from a sourdough starter that was cultivated for 21 days…super easy no-knead method.

I had made many sourdough breads in the past, and a few month ago decided to start a new sourdough starter. Since sourdough culture varies from location to location…I wanted a starter from our new (not so new) place.

I browsed through internet and came up with 20% whole wheat flour mixture with bread flour. It all started with 10 g of the flour mix plus 10 g of water (bottle), and after many feedings and pampering the sourdough starter and 21 days later I was content with what I got. It might have taken longer that usual as the weather was cold.

This recipe was a composition from mainly two YouTube videos, Full Proof Baking and Bake with Jack.  If you are into making sourdough bread, I highly recommend these videos as I learned a lot and use their techniques when baking bread.

– Why using sourdough starter?

It seems that baking bread with sourdough starter is healthier than using the conventional bread yeast due to the bread’s prebiotic content, therefore easier to digest.

– What is sourdough starter?

Sourdough starter is a culture of wild yeast found in flour. Like any fermented food, sourdough bread is fermented using lactobacillus. The combination of wild yeast (found in flour) and lactic-acid bacteria is what makes the dough rise.

– Is sourdough bread easier to digest?

Scientists believe that the prebiotic content in sourdough bread may improve gut health and ease digestion. Moreover, gluten levels are lower in sourdough bread as compared to traditional yeasted bread.

– Are you ready to try baking sourdough bread?

This particular recipe uses 80% hydration…meaning that I used 80 g of water for every 100 g of flour.

Ingredients:

  • 200 g mature sourdough starter (100% hydration)
  • 400 g bread flour
  • 300 g water
  • 10 g salt

Method:

In a medium bowl whisk the bread flour and water until all the water is totally incorporated into the flour. Cover and let it rest for about 2 to 3 hours, this is called autolyze.

Add the sourdough starter to the dough and mix until the starter is completely mixed to the dough. Use the stretch and fold method around the bowl, approximately 50 times. There will be gluten forming.

Cover the dough and let it rest for 30 minutes.

Add the salt and mix again using the stretch and fold method until all the salt is incorporated into the dough.

Rest for 30 minutes. Spray the counter with a little water and place the dough on it.  Laminate the dough and fold into thirds, twice. Place the dough back into the bowl and cover.

Rest for another 30 minutes. Spray the counter with a little amount of water and place the dough. Stretch and fold the dough to the center, 4 times around it. Place it back to the bowl and cover.

Rest for 45 minutes and repeat the stretch and fold the dough to the center.

Rest for 45 minutes. Place the dough over the moist counter and fold and coil the dough twice.

Rest for 45 minutes and repeat the fold and coil.

Rest for 45 minutes.  Sprinkle flour on the counter and on the top of the dough. Flip the bowl on the counter and let the dough fall on the flour surface.

Pre-shape the dough by stretching and folding to the center of the dough.

Flour well the banneton and place the dough seam up.

Place the dough in the refrigerator overnight, uncovered.

Next morning, pre-heat oven to 475oF with a tray of water.

In the meantime, boil more water.

Flip the dough from the banneton to a floury surface. Using a soft brush, gently brush off excess of flour. Make the cut on the dough and spray with water. Place the dough into the hot oven.  Carefully add the boiling water to the tray. Close the oven door.

Spray more water on the dough every 3 minutes, 3 times. After 15 minutes of baking, remove the water tray and the parchment paper underneath the bread. Lower the temperature to 375oF, bake for another 20 minutes.

Remove the bread from the oven and let it cool on a wire rack. Make sure the bread is completely cool before slicing.

– Looking for more bread recipe?

Check these out…

Thank you for visiting Color Your Recipes…have a colorful week!




Simple No-Knead Ciabatta

If you are looking for a simple and yet tasty ciabatta with just a few steps this will be perfect for you…

I love baking bread, trying all different kind of dough from no-knead to the ones using the mixer…the pleasure that I have with the first bread cutting is out of this world…the expectation of finding out how the crumb turned out.

I love seeing uneven holes in rustic bread and even, soft crumb in the Asian style bread…it is amazing to think that you can do so much with mainly two ingredients…flour and water and it all depends how you handle it…

My husband always teases me when I show him how the dough raises or the bubbles in the sourdough starter gets larger and larger…the truth is I am very content with these small things…anyway…let’s get back to the ciabatta.

– Where did I get the inspiration for this recipe?

Right here…at Umi’s Baking

– Why no-knead ciabatta?

Because it is easy and does not require any skills.

– Do I need any special gadget?

Absolutely not…just a scale and a rectangular container (plastic or glass).

– How long it will take me from the beginning until I have the ciabatta ready to eat?

If you start in the morning, in a warm day, you will be enjoying this light, soft and slightly chewy crumb ciabatta by lunch time.

– Should we start?

Here we go…

Ingredients:

  • 290 g water
  • 2 g yeast
  • 385 g bread flour
  • 30 g olive oil (or less if you prefer, 15 g)
  • 7 g salt

Method:

In a rectangle container with lid, mix the water with yeast.  Stir gently until all the yeast is totally dissolved.

Add in the flour and olive oil to the yeast mixture.  Mix using a Danish dough whisk as the dough will be very wet. Add the salt and continue to mix until the dough comes together.

Cover the dough and let it rest for 1 hour in a warm environment.

Using a fold/coil method, wet your hands and reach under the dough which is spread on the container and lift slowly, the front of the dough will detach and go under forming a coil, repeat on the opposite side. Then use the same method on the other side.

Let the dough rest for 30 minutes and repeat the method of fold/coil. Again, rest for another 30 minutes and last fold/coil in the container.

Rest for 40 to 45 minutes, sprinkle flour on the counter and on top of the dough. Turn the container with the dough on the counter and let the dough fall into the flour surface.

Sprinkle more flour on the dough and loose the bottom with the help of dough scraper.

Cut into 4 pieces, and place them on a flour couch. Sprinkle more flour on the top if necessary to avoid sticking. Cover for approximately 45 to 50 minutes.

In the meantime preheat the oven to 450oF with a pan containing water.

Gently transfer the dough to a pan lined with parchment paper.

Bake for 15 minutes at 450oF. Remove the water in the oven and bake for another 10 minutes. Lower the temperature to 425o F and bake for another 5 minutes.

Remove from the oven and let it cool completely on a wire rack.

– Ready for more no-knead bread recipes?

Check these out…

Thank you for visiting Color Your Recipes…have a colorful week!




No-Knead Rosemary Rolls

Care for a rosemary bread roll which is light and crumb filled with lots or air pockets? You arrived at the right place…

 

– What is hydration in bread language?

This bread contains 80% hydration, which means for every 100g of flour 80g of water is added to the dough…in another word, it is the percentage of the liquid in relation to the flour in weight.

Regular bread usually the hydration is in between 58 and 65%, so you can imagine 80% hydration, the dough is super wet, sticky, therefore impossible to knead…but using a simple method of stretch and fold almost like magic will be able to produce a bread with a crumb that is super light, airy, with lots of air pockets and a crispy crust.

– What is poolish?

Yes, it is a sort of starter, pre-fermented dough added to the final dough and consist of a mixture of same weight of flour and water with a little bit of the leavening agent such as yeast.

Adding polish to the final bread dough adds flavor and more texture, and somehow, I feel that increases the speed of the bulk fermentation.

It is not a big deal to make polish, you just must plan…if you plan to make bread, before going to bed make your poolish and it will be ready when you wake up.

– How about a hint of fresh rosemary?

Absolutely wonderful, you will be amazed of what just adding fresh minced rosemary to the dough will do…it will wake your sense of smell, you will want to inhale every bit of the aroma of the bread and rosemary in the air…got the feeling?  Okay…

– Now it is time to get working…

Ingredients:

Poolish

  • 150 g water
  • 150 g bread flour
  • 1 pinch yeast

Dough

  • 150 g water
  • 225 g bread flour
  • 4 g salt
  • 2 g yeast
  • 4-6 sprigs of rosemary, minced
  • Extra flour for dusting or cornmeal

Method:

Poolish

Place all the ingredients under the poolish in a medium to large bowl.  Using a fork or a Danish dough hand whisk, mix well until all the water is absorbed by the flour. The dough very, very sticky. Cover the bowl and place in a warm place overnight or up to 16 hours.

Dough

Add the 150g of water and the yeast to the poolish and mix well. Add the remaining ingredients and mix with a fork or Danish whisk into a wet dough.

Using the stretch and fold method (see the description here) go around the bowl 40 times stretch and fold, 4 times stretch and fold make a complete circle around the bowl.

Leave the dough to rest for 45 minutes.

Repeat the stretch and fold around the bowl once (set of 4 stretch and fold), followed by a 45 minutes rest, 3 more times, totaling 4 times.

On last time of stretch and fold, followed by 1 hour rest.

Turn the dough out on to a lightly floured surface and stretch and fold once, placing the seam under.

Cut the dough into approximately 12 portions (I used a scale, 56g each roll). Let the dough rest for another 10-15 minutes.

Stretch and fold each portion and place the seam under. Place the rolls on a baking pan lined with parchment paper dusted with flour or cornmeal.

Lightly dust the rolls with more flour before covering and let it rise for 1 to 2 hours, until double its size.

Preheat oven to 4750C. Place a pan with water at the bottom of the oven to create steam.

Spray generously each roll and score the rolls or use a scissors.

Let it bake for 5 minutes and repeat the water spray. Another 5 minutes in the oven and spray again with water and turn the pan around so the rolls bake evenly.

Let it bake for another 5 minutes or until the crust turns brown.

Remove the rolls from the oven and cool on a wire rack.

Please allow to cool before devour it…

I hope you enjoy this simple method to make great bread…

– More bread recipes?  Take a look at the recipes below.

Did you know that rosemary has been used since ancient Greeks? Rosemary has its origins in the Mediterranean region. Apparently rosemary contains essential oils known to boost memory and contain high levels of antioxidants.

Thank you for visiting Color Your Recipes…have a colorful week!




No-Knead French Baguette with Overnight Poolish

This is another no-knead bread recipe with a twist. The rustic baguette is airy with all size of air pocket in its crumb. The bread is soft and slightly chewy with a crunchy crust. It is perfect for you everyday sandwich.

This is such a simple recipe for no-knead bread.  Just be aware that a little planning is necessary for this recipe since it requires an overnight fermentation.

The addition of an extra step of making polish the night before is so worth it, it sure adds an extra deep flavor to the bread. Another nice thing…since the poolish is a pre-fermented dough the fermentation time of the final dough is much shorter, therefore in a fairly warm day, if you start the process early in the morning you might even have the bread ready for lunch.

This recipe calls for 80% hydration, meaning that the dough is pretty wet since for every 100g flour 80g water is added.

Ingredients:

Poolish

  • 100 g water
  • 100 g bread flour
  • 1 pinch yeast

Bread Dough

  • 150 g bread flour
  • 100 g water
  • 2 g yeast
  • 3 g salt

Method:

Poolish

The night before baking the bread, in a medium bowl place all the ingredients listed under polish.

Mix using a Danish whisk or a fork. Make sure mixture is evenly combined. Scrap the walls of the bowl and cover.

Place the mixture over the counter in a warm place of the kitchen.

Bread Dough

The polish should be all bubbly with a fresh fermentation smell. Add the water and mix gently using the Danish whisk or a fork to incorporate the water into the polish. Add the flour, yeast and salt, mixing all together. The dough will be soft and sticky.

Use a “stretch and fold” method: using a wet hand or Danish whisk, scrape a section of the dough (approximately ¼), lift and stretch it, then fold into the center of the bowl. Repeat 4 rounds around the bowl, being each round a complete circle of 4 “stretch and fold”.

Cover the dough and let it rest in a warm place of the kitchen for 30 minutes. Repeat 4 rounds of “stretch and fold” and let it rest 45 minutes in between.

After the last round of “stretch and fold” let the dough rest for 45 minutes to 1 hour.

Preheat oven to 475F with a pan of water on the lower rack.

Gently remove the dough from the bowl over a floured surface and split the dough into approximately 2 portions.

Fold the dough over itself and roll as you push out until elongated in the form of baguette. Repeat with the other dough.

Place the baguettes on the baking couch. Dust the top of the baguette with flour and gently cover the baguettes with a plastic film.

Leave to rest for approximately 1 hour or until almost double from its original size.

Transfer the baguette on to a cookie sheet lined with parchment paper lightly dusted with cornmeal.

Spray the baguettes generously with water. Using a sharp scissor cut the bread making diagonal marks of approximately 45 degree, make sure to tuck in the tips.

Let it bake for 5 minutes and repeat the water spray. Another 5 minutes in the oven and spray again with water. Turn the pan around and turn the oven down to 425F so the baguettes bake evenly. Let it bake for another 10 minutes or until the crust turns brown.

I hope you enjoy this simple method to make your everyday baguette…for more bread recipes, pleas check HERE.

Thank you for visiting Color Your Recipes…have a colorful week!




Sourdough No-Knead Bread

Nothing is more comforting than home baked sourdough bread, crispy and slightly chewy…

Before I start, I must admit that I almost gave up on the sourdough starter, not to mention the frustration and the defeat feeling and on top of it I really felt insulted since I had so much training in microbiology laboratory.  Well, determination won the case…and I finally cultivated a few jars of very healthy sourdough starter.  Therefore with all my “manipulations” and add a bit here, take a bit there, I am not sharing a recipe for the starter…as you can easily search on the internet and look for a recipe that best suit you.

What I am sharing with you is the wonderful bread that I made with the sourdough starter…just bear in mind that my sourdough starter has 100% hydration, meaning that the weight of flour and water is exactly the same.

This particular recipe has 85% hydration, therefore the dough is very “wet”, you can easily adjust to less hydration such as 83%, which will make it easier to handle.

Ingredients:

  • 90 g of sourdough starter
  • 300 g bread flour (100g plus 200g)
  • 5 g salt

Method:

The day before baking the bread, mix together the sourdough starter with 100g bread flour and 100g water.

Let the mix at room temperature for about 10 hours or overnight.

After the “incubation” time add 130g water, the remaining 200g bread flour and the salt.  Mix well and proceed as described here.

If you enjoy this no-knead sourdough bread, you might want to take a looks at the No-Knead French Baguette recipe.

 

Did you know that sourdough dough is fermented by a combination of wild yeast and lactobacillus? Lactobacillus is the bacillus used to produce yogurt, sauerkraut, cheese and other fermented food products.

Thank you for stopping by Color Your Recipes…have a colorful day!




No-Knead French Baguette

Who does not like freshly baked French baguette! Especially that it is so easy…no-kneading needed for this recipe…

A friend of mine turned me onto this recipe, which was adapted from Food Wishes. No need to mention that I have made this bread many times and even once baked to take to work upon request, I kind of felt so embarrassed because this recipe is literally very simple. What can be easier than a no-knead bread? Oh! I got many request to share the recipe…so here it is…

Okay, let me take back…the only time consuming is when you place the baguettes in the oven as they need to be misted with water every 5 minutes…other than that, it is no fuss…and it sure looks like that they came from a professional bakery.

Ingredients:

  • ½ teaspoon yeast
  • 300 g water
  • 375 g bread flour
  • ¾ teaspoon salt

Method:

In a medium bowl, mix all the ingredients and let it rise overnight or until double at room temperature. The dough will be sticky, but will come out from the wall.

Next day, when ready to bake, gently remove the dough from the bowl over a floured surface and split the dough into approximately 3 portions.

Fold the dough over itself and roll as you push out until elongated in the form of baguette. Repeat with the other dough.

Place the baguettes on a cookie sheet on a floured parchment paper. Dust the top of the baguette with flour and gently cover the baguettes with a plastic film.

Leave to rest for approximately 1 to 1 ½ hour or until almost double from its original size.

Preheat oven to 550F (or as high as your oven will permit). Place a pan with water on the bottom rack of the oven.

Use a sharp scissor cut the bread making diagonal marks of approximately 45 degree, make sure to tuck in the tips.

When ready to place the baguettes in the oven spray the baguettes generously with water. Let it bake for 5 minutes and repeat the water spray. Another 5 minutes in the oven and spray again with water and turn the pan around so the baguettes bake evenly. Let it bake for another 5 minutes or until the crust turns brown.

When the baguettes are done, remove from the oven and let them cool on a wire rack for 10 minutes or so…now you can start enjoying the bread.

 

If you enjoy this simple and easy no-knead French baguette recipe, you might want to check on the Sourdough No-Knead Bread recipes.

 

Did you know that all no-knead bread requires a very high hydration? This way gluten strands can form throughout the wet dough producing the uneven holes where the carbon dioxides (CO2) generated by the yeast are trapped.

Thank you for stopping by Color Your Recipes…have a colorful day!